A flat grind that begins at the blade's spine is called a "full flat grind"; a "saber grind" begins its bevel lower on the blade; and a Scandinavian (or "Scandi") grind begins lower still. In some styles, the flat side will actually be ground to be slightly concave (see: hollow grind) so as to reduce drag and stickiness to help the food separate easily. How to sharpen it: A flat grind can be sharpened on a stone or other flat hone, or by using a guided sharpening system. $279.95. Instead of the bevel going to the centreline, it extend upward a little higher (but not all the way to the spine). Where a saber grind might outperform the flat and Scandi, is where working with the point is needed, such as turning a hole into a fire starting board. Of course, if you’re deciding on this grind, you’ll have to take into account which is your dominant hand so you put the cutting edge on the right side—if you’re right handed, the grind will be on the right. A saber grind starts below the spine vs Full Flat Grind ("FFG") that starts at the spine. The Scandinavian grind, or Scandi grind, is a short flat (occasionally convex) grind on a thin blade where the primary grind is also the edge bevel. The L.T. Instead, the sabre grind will typically only be ground to around the mid-way point on the blade. Double Bevel – (AKA “compound bevel”) – Visualize the double bevel by picturing the sabre grind, but both bevels are elongated and moved further up the blade. As such, there are better grinds used for slicing if that’s what you’re looking for. Inertia is your friend: Another benefit of a Scandi grind is that you can achieve a thin edge and, unlike with a full flat grind, you maintain the blade weight of a saber grind.Having that bit of extra spine weight increases your ability to drive the edge forward. Full Flat Grind – The blade is ground all the way from the cutting edge to the spine in one long bevel, thus forming a “V” shape (insert pop up picture of guy with v shape lats). Convex vs Scandi Grind Bushcraft Knives - Duration: 16:14. Now our bushcraft knives philosophy is to always carry two knives, one scandi and one sabre grind blade. Many of the Scandinavian blades seem to have a secondary bevel. There is no secondary edge grind. You’ll see this grind on Japanese swords, like katanas. And if you have experience with straight razors, you’ll know they need constant stropping for maintenance. This style is called urasuki. Also common on some military and "tactical" knives. Once again another thread on bcuk ruined. Though they may get full quicker, the advantage to a simple grind like the flat grinds is that they’re easy and quick to sharpen. Because it's relatively difficult to master, however, this technique is best reserved for emergencies in the field. In addition to taking inventory of your tools and free time, you’ll want to make the above considerations to help you choose the right grind. The GNS is ground with either a Scandi Grind or a Saber Grind. You’ll notice that this type of grind slices easily as there is less drag. What it's good for: Hunting, woodworking, food preparation, axes, general use. What you may not know: The double-bevel or compound grind, in its many forms, is arguably the most common profile produced today. L.T. It is superior for splitting wood, and does very well for cleaning fish. Christ. Chisel grind — As on a chisel , only one side is ground (often at an edge angle of about 20–30°); the other remains flat. The edge is. What it's good for: Straight razors (shaving), hunting (skinning), food preparation (slicing), axes (special "speed grind" used on some competition axes). However, when it’s not, it’s what knife makers refer to as a scandi grind. Here are the GNS specifications: The GNS by L.T. Of course, if you’re deciding on this grind, you’ll have to take into account which is your dominant hand so you put the cutting edge on the right side—if you’re, The chisel bevel is actually quite practical for working with wood as well. Many Japanese culinary knives are produced with a chisel grind. From top to bottom: full flat, high saber (flat), saber (flat), scandi. A hollow grind doesn't produce a very strong edge, and therefore generally isn't suitable for sustained use on hard or fibrous materials. This particular profile helps significantly reduce drag compared to the sabre grind (often used on Western swords) which explains how the katana can slice and dice with ease. Also, you could use a smaller pocket sharpening stone when you are on the road or out in the field. Email Us. This keen cutting edge comes at a price: the sharper or more acute your bevel, the less durability the edge has. Scandi VS Saber VS Flat VS Convex | LT Wright Knife Grinds - Duration: 4:25. Because a hollow-ground blade has the potential to be extraordinarily sharp, however, it can benefit greatly from stropping. What it's good for: Whittling, woodworking, food preparation, general use. This additional uniform-thickness metal on the top portion of the blade will add strength and weight, thus making it quite suitable for military as well as heavy use. For more information about sharpening your knives, whatever the grind, visit our Knife Sharpening page. This type of grind will often see use in the hunting community as skinning and dressing knives—in fact, our good ole’ Bowie Knife is a hollow grind! That's why we've put together this primer on some common grinds you'll encounter in the knife world. Many knife aficionados consider a convex grind the strongest and most durable profile. What you may not know: A practiced hand can sharpen a convex-ground knife on a hard surface or a flat stone. the grinds on both sides meet to make the edge. Making a gorgeous handmade custom camping knife, Crafting a full-blown kitchen knife from scratch, A guide to building a custom chef’s knife for the kitchen, How to make a hand-powered charcoal forge, How to make a knife handle out of birch bark and antler, © 2017 I Made A Knife! LT Wright Outback 3V - Saber - Black Micarta - Thick Snakeskin Liners - Matte Finish. As a rule of thumb, the more acute (closer to 0°) the angle, the sharper it will be and the better its cutting ability. Most of the hollow-ground knives produced today have a secondary V-bevel at the edge, and so can be sharpened on a stone or other flat hone, or by using a guided sharpening system. As such, there are better grinds used for, – (AKA “zero bevel grind” or “single bevel grind”) – Just like a—you guessed it—chisel, this knife edge is flat on one side and the opposite side ground between 20-30 degrees to about halfway up toward the spine. It will split better than a flat grind and slice food better than a Scandi. The Finnish puukko is an example of a Scandinavian-ground knife. The benefit of a double bevel is that it keeps the blade resilient and resistant to chipping and rolling. LT Wright Outback 3V - Scandi - Double Red - … The flat grind is the simplest grind … – The blade is ground all the way from the cutting edge to the spine in one long bevel, thus forming a “V” shape (insert pop up picture of guy with v shape lats). LT Wright Outback 3V - Saber - Camo Linen Micarta - Matte Finish ... Scandi - Burlap Micarta - Thick Natural Liners - Matte Finish. What it is: A hollow grind features symmetric, concave surfaces ending in a thin, extremely sharp edge. The grinds on each side do not quite meet so there is an edge grind … That way you not only have a backup blade, but also have a larger more durable knife for heavier work. Because it’s difficult to produce on a flat stone, this grind is often achieved by using a slackened belt on a belt grinder. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, 10 Essential Knife Shapes and Styles To Know, http://www.spyderco.com/edge-u-cation/knife-anatomy/blade-grinds/, http://lansky.com/index.php/blog/knife-edge-grinds-and-uses/, https://www.theknifeconnection.net/blade-grind-types/, http://www.echefknife.com/blog/anatomy-japanese-single-edged-knives/, Essential Knife Care and Maintenance Tips, The Only Article On Knife Grinds You’ll Ever Need, The “Patina” Explained and a Guide to Do It Yourself. $259.95. This grind makes for some wickedly sharp chef’s knives and is often seen used for Japanese culinary knives. This grind makes for some wickedly sharp chef’s knives and is often seen used for Japanese culinary knives. High Flat Grind – The high flat grind is simply a hybrid of the two above. When you grind a knife down from its original rectangular shape, you’re creating bevels that eventually meet at a point. The Hollow Grind has been a historically popular type of grind, especially in the hunting community. These inward-facing bevels may extend all the way up the blade or just a portion of it. How to sharpen it: As with a V-bevel, a double-bevel grind can be sharpened on a stone or other flat hone, or by using a guided sharpening system. The edge is sharp and as such will need to be sharpened and maintained more often than other grinds. T he Scandi grind is also called the Scandinavian or Sabre grind and refers to a form of flat grind. - 4. Also, I show you how I grind the scandi grind. The GNS comes with a handcrafted leather dangler sheath, with double stitching and a 3/8″ fire steel holder. – (AKA “zero sabre grind” or “scandi”, short for “Scandanavian” grind) – The, – The knife is ground to create a very sharp but fragile concave bevel cutting edge. It was very fun to go out and film with four different LT Wright blades. What you may not know: The concave surfaces of a hollow grind tend to draw the work against the blade and toward the edge before the flat surfaces (higher on the blade) push it away, which is why many knife lovers prefer this profile for slicing and skinning. Instead, the sabre grind will typically only be ground to around the mid-way point on the blade. http://www.wcknives.com What it's good for: Whittling, woodworking, food preparation, general use. Convex Grind – (AKA “axe grind” or “Hamaguir”) – As the name suggests, this is the opposite of the hollow grind. Thanks for reaching out! How is it different from other knife designs? Instead of straight edges like the flat grind or edges that bow inward, these ones actually curve outward in a convex fashion, resembling the likes of a clamshell. The sides curve inward until they meet. Well done chaps. Sometimes we have to remind ourselves, though, that not everyone lives and breathes this stuff, and that the lingo we use might need translation. A scandi grind goes to zero; i.e. If you were to point a knife directly between your two eyes, this is the shape you would see—just don’t look too close. It’s used to retain some of the weight and strength that a full flat gives up, while achieving a keener angle than the sabre grind. Flat grinds are great for whittling and general use. Technically, all are flat grinds. This means that you do not have a secondary edge bevel/grind at all; there is only the one primary grind which is ground to zero to make the edge, sometimes called a … FAQ: What are the advantages and disadvantages of different grinds. Chisel Grind – (AKA “zero bevel grind” or “single bevel grind”) – Just like a—you guessed it—chisel, this knife edge is flat on one side and the opposite side ground between 20-30 degrees to about halfway up toward the spine. It's advisable to lightly draw the opposite (straight) side of the edge across the hone occasionally, to remove any burr that may develop during sharpening. What you may not know: The flat grind is the simplest and most basic profile. Over the years we've handled and used thousands of knives. It is good of you all to take the trouble to educate me on these issues. As the V-grind name implies the Scandi grind is V-shaped, but the angle doesn’t fully go up to the spine. You’ll see them used on axes a lot for chopping as the shape helps reduce drag as it splits through the wood. What it's good for: Woodworking, food preparation. Generally speaking, only the secondary bevel (the one producing the cutting edge) will require attention. I'll get back to you as soon as I can. Stock Endura saber ground is a good example. http://www.imadeaknife.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/mainlogobig.png. Sabre Grind – (AKA “zero sabre grind” or “scandi”, short for “Scandanavian” grind) – The sabre is the same as a flat grind, except the bevel doesn’t extend all the way to the spine. Basically, blade grind refers to how the cross-section of the blade is shaped to produce the cutting edge. A scandi grind can easily be sharpened on sharpening stones because of the broad cutting edge. The reason I suggest starting with a Scandi ground blade is because of the large, flat bevel that you can lay flat on a stone, without guessing the angle. Many hunting knives utilize a saber style grind, possibly due to the multi-use characteristics of the grind. ... Saber Grind - Bocote - Brass Corby Bolts - 5 / FREE Black Liners! What it is: On a convex grind, the sharp edge is produced by symmetric, gently curved surfaces.
2020 scandi vs saber grind